Midfoot and ankle motion during heel rise and gait are related in people with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy

Hyo Jung Jeong, Michael J. Mueller, Jennifer A. Zellers, Mary K. Hastings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Midfoot and ankle movement dysfunction in people with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy (DMPN) is associated with midfoot deformity and increased plantar pressures during gait. If midfoot and ankle motion during heel rise and push-off of gait have similar mechanics, heel rise performance could be a clinically feasible way to identify abnormal midfoot and ankle function during gait. Research question: Is midfoot and ankle joint motion during a heel rise associated with midfoot and ankle motion at push-off during gait in people with DMPN? Methods: Sixty adults with DMPN completed double-limb heel rise, single-limb heel rise, and walking. A modified Oxford multi-segment foot model (forefoot, hindfoot, shank) was used to analyze midfoot (forefoot on hindfoot) and ankle (hindfoot on shank) sagittal angle during heel rise and gait. Pearson correlation was used to test the relationship between heel rise and gait kinematic variables (n = 60). Additionally, we classified 60 participants into two subgroups based on midfoot and ankle position at peak heel rise: midfoot and ankle dorsiflexed (dorsiflexed; n = 23) and midfoot and ankle plantarflexed (plantarflexed; n = 20). Movement trajectories of midfoot and ankle motion during single-limb heel rise and gait of the subgroups were examined. Results: Peak double-limb heel rise and gait midfoot and ankle angles were significantly correlated (r = 0.49 and r = 0.40, respectively). Peak single-limb heel rise and gait midfoot and ankle angles were significantly correlated (r = 0.63 and r = 0.54, respectively). The dorsiflexed subgroup, identified by heel rise performance showed greater midfoot and ankle dorsiflexion during gait compared to the plantarflexed subgroup (mean difference between subgroups: midfoot 3°, ankle 3°). Significance: People with DMPN who fail to plantarflex the midfoot and ankle during heel rise have difficulty plantarflexing the midfoot and ankle during gait. Utilizing a heel rise task may help identify midfoot and ankle dysfunction associated with gait in people with DMPN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-44
Number of pages7
JournalGait and Posture
Volume84
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Forefoot
  • Hindfoot
  • Kinematics
  • Plantarflexion
  • Walking

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