Mannose-derived FimH antagonists: A promising anti-virulence therapeutic strategy for urinary tract infections and Crohns disease

Laurel K. Mydock-Mcgrane, Zachary T. Cusumano, James W. Janetka

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Type 1 pili are utilized by Gram-negative bacteria to adhere to host tissue and thus are a key virulence factor in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and Crohns disease (CD). This adhesion is mediated through specific binding of the terminal adhesin, FimH, to mannosylated host glycoproteins. FimH is essential for UTI pathogenesis and thus is a promising therapeutic target.Areas Covered: Herein, we review the structural frameworks of FimH antagonists disclosed in the patent literature. X-ray crystallographic binding studies of D-mannose and early FimH antagonists have uncovered key molecular interactions. Exploiting this knowledge, mannosides with extraordinarily high binding affinities have been designed. Structure-Activity relationships (SAR) and structure-property relationship (SPR) studies have resulted in the rapid development of orally bioavailable FimH antagonists with promising therapeutic potential for UTI and CD.Expert opinion: It is our opinion that biaryl or two-ring mannosides, which represent the largest and most thoroughly tested class of FimH antagonists, also hold the most promise as a novel treatment for UTIs. These antagonists have also been shown to have efficacy in treating CD. Judging from the strong preclinical data, we predict that one or more FimH antagonists will be entering the clinic within the next 1-2 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)175-197
Number of pages23
JournalExpert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • E. coli bacteria
  • FimH
  • carbohydrate
  • gram-negative
  • lectin
  • mannoside
  • type 1 pili
  • urinary tract infection
  • virulence factor

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