Lysosome repair enables host cell survival and bacterial persistence following Chlamydia trachomatis infection

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Abstract

Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that replicate within the confines of a membrane-bound vacuole termed the inclusion. The final event in the infectious process is the disruption of the inclusion membrane and release of a multitude of infectious elementary bodies, each capable of eliciting a new infection. Strains of the trachoma biovar of Chlamydia trachomatis are released from the host cell without concomitant host cell death. In this study, analysis of events associated with chlamydial egress revealed that the integrity of the host cell plasma membrane was compromised prior to the inclusion membrane. This disruption was accompanied by the appearance of LAMP-1 at the infected cell surface, implicating lysosome repair of plasma membrane lesions in response to infection. Analysis of the effects of calcium chelators and actin stabilizing agents, indicated calcium-induced actin depolymerization as a requisite to lysosome-plasma membrane fusion and host cell survival. A consequence of this lysosome-mediated repair process, was the retention of residual bacteria within the surviving host cell, providing a unique mechanism for intracellular persistence of C. trachomatis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2141-2152
Number of pages12
JournalCellular microbiology
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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