Lysoptosis is an evolutionarily conserved cell death pathway moderated by intracellular serpins

Cliff J. Luke, Stephanie Markovina, Misty Good, Ira E. Wight, Brian J. Thomas, John M. Linneman, Wyatt E. Lanik, Olga Koroleva, Maggie R. Coffman, Mark T. Miedel, Qingqing Gong, Arlise Andress, Marlene Campos Guerrero, Songyan Wang, Li Yun Chen, Wandy L. Beatty, Kelsey N. Hausmann, Frances V. White, James A.J. Fitzpatrick, Anthony OrvedahlStephen C. Pak, Gary A. Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cathepsin release typifies lysosome-dependent cell death (LDCD). However, LMP occurs in most regulated cell death programs suggesting LDCD is not an independent cell death pathway, but is conscripted to facilitate the final cellular demise by other cell death routines. Previously, we demonstrated that Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) null for a cysteine protease inhibitor, srp-6, undergo a specific LDCD pathway characterized by LMP and cathepsin-dependent cytoplasmic proteolysis. We designated this cell death routine, lysoptosis, to distinguish it from other pathways employing LMP. In this study, mouse and human epithelial cells lacking srp-6 homologues, mSerpinb3a and SERPINB3, respectively, demonstrated a lysoptosis phenotype distinct from other cell death pathways. Like in C. elegans, this pathway depended on LMP and released cathepsins, predominantly cathepsin L. These studies suggested that lysoptosis is an evolutionarily-conserved eukaryotic LDCD that predominates in the absence of neutralizing endogenous inhibitors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number47
JournalCommunications Biology
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

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