Low health literacy is associated with HIV test acceptance

Maribel Barragán, Giselle Hicks, Mark V. Williams, Carlos Franco-Paredes, Duffus Wayne, Carlos Del Rio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has proposed increasing the proportion of people who learn their HIV serostatus. The health care setting represents a logical site to accomplish this goal. However, little is known about factors that determine acceptability of HIV testing in health care settings, particularly patients' health literacy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between patients' health literacy and acceptance of HIV testing among individuals at an urgent care center (UCC). METHODS: As part of a prospective study that sought to increase HIV testing at a UCC located in an inner-city hospital serving an indigent population, we surveyed patients who had been offered an HIV test by their providers and had accepted or refused testing. Pretest counseling was provided using a low-literacy brochure given to patients upon registration into the clinic. We measured health literacy level using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM) scale. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy-two patients were enrolled in the study. In univariate analysis, no statistically significant difference between HIV test acceptors or refusers was found for gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, income, type of health insurance, educational level, or type of test offered. Acceptors were more likely to have a low literacy level (odds ratio [OR], 1.763: 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.084 to 2.866) and be less than 40 years old (OR, 1.639; 95% CI, 1.085 to 2.475). In multivariate analysis, low health literacy was shown to be a predictor of HIV test acceptance controlling for age and education (OR, 2.017; 95% CI, 1.190 to 3.418). CONCLUSIONS: Low health literacy was shown to be a predictor of HIV test acceptance. Patients presenting to a UCC with poorer health literacy appear more willing to comply with health care providers' recommendations to undergo HIV testing than those with adequate health literacy when an "opt-out" strategy combined with a low-literacy brochure is used.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-425
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of general internal medicine
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Keywords

  • Health literacy
  • HIV testing and counseling

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Low health literacy is associated with HIV test acceptance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this