Low-Dose and Short-Duration Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Inhibition Does Not Affect Adhesion Formation during Murine Flexor Tendon Healing

Caitlin A. Orner, Michael B. Geary, Warren C. Hammert, Regis J. O'Keefe, Alayna E. Loiselle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: After flexor tendon injury and repair, adhesion formation is a substantial concern, as it can result in loss of motion and functional disability. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) is a gelatinase that contributes to degradation of extracellular matrix and is expressed during flexor tendon healing. Mmp9-/- mice have accelerated remodeling of adhesions during flexor tendon healing, relative to wild-type mice. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Ro 32-3555, an Mmp9 inhibitor, can improve flexor tendon healing by limiting adhesion formation or enhancing remodeling of scar tissue during murine flexor tendon healing. Methods: Flexor digitorum longus laceration and repair was performed in female C57BL/6J mice. Mice were treated with vehicle or the Mmp9 inhibitor Ro 32-3555 for 8 days. Analysis was performed for digit range of motion and gliding function, biomechanics, gene expression, and Mmp9 activity. Results: An Mmp9 activity assay and zymography confirmed suppression of Mmp9 activity in mice treated with Ro 32-3555. There was no significant difference in tendon gliding or range of motion between vehicle and Ro 32-3555-treated mice. There was also no difference in tendon biomechanical properties between the two groups. Conclusion: Local inhibition of Mmp9 gelatinolytic activity at the flexor tendon repair site is insufficient to alter adhesion formation, remodeling of adhesions, or mechanical properties of healing murine flexor tendons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)545e-553e
JournalPlastic and reconstructive surgery
Volume137
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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