Loss of the putative RNA-directed RNA polymerase RRF-3 makes C. Elegans hypersensitive to RNAi

Femke Simmer, Marcel Tijsterman, Susan Parrish, Sandhya P. Koushika, Michael L. Nonet, Andrew Fire, Julie Ahringer, Ronald H.A. Plasterk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

440 Scopus citations

Abstract

RNA interference (RNAi) is a broadly used reverse genetics method in C. elegans [1]. Unfortunately, RNAi does not inhibit all genes [2, 3]. We show that loss of function of a putative RNA-directed RNA polymerase (RdRP) of C. elegans, RRF-3, results in a substantial enhancement of sensitivity to RNAi in diverse tissues. This is particularly striking in the nervous system; neurons that are generally refractory to RNAi in a wildtype genetic background can respond effectively to interference in an rrf-3 mutant background. These data provide the first indication of physiological negative modulation of the RNAi response and implicate an RdRP-related factor in this effect. The rrf-3 strain can be useful to study genes that, in wild-type, do not show a phenotype after RNAi, and it is probably the strain of choice for genome-wide RNAi screens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1317-1319
Number of pages3
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume12
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 6 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Loss of the putative RNA-directed RNA polymerase RRF-3 makes C. Elegans hypersensitive to RNAi'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this