Loss of resting interhemispheric functional connectivity after complete section of the corpus callosum

James M. Johnston, S. Neil Vaishnavi, Matthew D. Smyth, Dongyang Zhang, Biyu J. He, John M. Zempel, Joshua S. Shimony, Abraham Z. Snyder, Marcus E. Raichle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

217 Scopus citations

Abstract

Slow (<0.1 Hz), spontaneous fluctuations in the functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal have been shown to exhibit phase coherence within functionally related areas of the brain. Surprisingly, this phenomenon appears to transcend levels of consciousness. The genesis of coherent BOLD fluctuations remains to be fully explained. We present a resting state functional connectivity study of a 6-year-old child with a radiologically normal brain imaged both before and after complete section of the corpus callosum for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Postoperatively, there was a striking loss of interhemispheric BOLD correlations with preserved intrahemispheric correlations. These unique data provide important insights into the relationship between connectional anatomy and functional organization of the human brain. Such observations have the potential to increase our understanding of large-scale brain systems in health and disease as well as improve the treatment of neurologic disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6453-6458
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume28
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 18 2008

Keywords

  • Corpus callosotomy
  • Epilepsy
  • Functional connectivity
  • Resting state
  • Synchrony
  • fMRI

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