Loss of electrical anisotropy is an unrecognized feature of dystrophic muscle that may serve as a convenient index of disease status

Seward B. Rutkove, Jim S. Wu, Craig Zaidman, Kush Kapur, Sung Yim, Amy Pasternak, Lavanya Madabusi, Heather Szelag, Tim Harrington, Jia Li, Adam Pacheck, Basil T. Darras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective We sought to understand the alteration in the anisotropic, or direction dependent, character of muscle as measured by electrical impedance myography (EIM) in subjects with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and its potential to serve as a biomarker of disease status. Methods Thirty-six boys with DMD and 27 healthy controls were measured with EIM, with electrical current applied both parallel and perpendicular to the major muscle fiber direction. In addition, muscle extracted from 10 mdx and 10 wild-type mice were measured analogously. Results Normalized reactance anisotropy, a direction-dependent measure of membrane charge storage capability, was significantly lower in the four muscles of DMD subjects as compared to controls (p < 0.01). Normalized reactance anisotropy also decreased with increasing age in DMD subjects (r = −0.36, p = 0.031), but not in healthy boys. Analogous changes were observed in mdx mouse gastrocnemius as compared to wild type (p = 0.019). Conclusion These results support that loss of electrical anisotropy is a previously unrecognized feature of dystrophic muscle. Significance Anisotropic alterations may offer novel indices to assist in neuromuscular disease diagnosis and to serve as easy-to-obtain biomarkers in clinical therapeutic trials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3546-3551
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume127
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Anisotropy
  • Biomarker
  • Duchenne muscular dystrophy
  • Impedance

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Loss of electrical anisotropy is an unrecognized feature of dystrophic muscle that may serve as a convenient index of disease status'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this