Long-term patterns of relapse and survival following definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for non-endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Jeremy Setton, James Han, Danita Kannarunimit, Yen Ruh Wuu, Stephen A. Rosenberg, Carl Deselm, Suzanne L. Wolden, C. Jillian Tsai, Sean M. McBride, Nadeem Riaz, Nancy Y. Lee

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27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background We report treatment outcomes for a large non-endemic cohort of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and chemotherapy. Methods We identified 177 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed, non-metastatic nasopharyngeal cancer treated with definitive IMRT between 1998 and 2011. Endpoints included local, regional, distant control, and overall survival. Results Median follow-up was 52 months. The 3-/5-year actuarial rates of local control, regional control, distant control, and overall survival were 92%/83%, 93%/91%, 86%/83%, and 87%/74%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 30 months; the annual hazard of local recurrence did not diminish until the 6th year of follow-up. Conclusions Overall, we observed excellent rates of disease control and survival consistent with initially reported results from our institution. Attaining locoregional control in patients with extensive primary tumors remains a significant clinical challenge. With mature follow-up we observed that more than half of observed local relapses occurred after 2 years, a pattern distinct from that of carcinomas arising from other head and neck sites. These findings raise the possibility that patients with NPC may benefit from close follow-up during post-treatment years 3-5.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-73
Number of pages7
JournalOral Oncology
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Clinical outcomes
  • IMRT
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma
  • Radiotherapy

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    Setton, J., Han, J., Kannarunimit, D., Wuu, Y. R., Rosenberg, S. A., Deselm, C., Wolden, S. L., Jillian Tsai, C., McBride, S. M., Riaz, N., & Lee, N. Y. (2016). Long-term patterns of relapse and survival following definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for non-endemic nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Oral Oncology, 53, 67-73. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.oraloncology.2015.11.015