Lifestyle Risk Behaviors among Stroke Survivors with and Without Diabetes

Ryan R. Bailey, Allison Phad, Ryan McGrath, Andria L. Ford, Rachel Tabak, Debra Haire-Joshu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

History of stroke and diabetes increases risk for cardiometabolic disease, which can be mitigated through lifestyle management. To evaluate lifestyle risk behaviors among stroke survivors, we compared the prevalence of three lifestyle risk behaviors - physical inactivity, consuming one or less fruit and one or less vegetable daily, and overweight/obesity - between stroke survivors with and without diabetes. Design Data 2013 and 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were examined. Weighted and age-adjusted prevalence estimates as well as crude and adjusted odds ratios (adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics) were calculated to compare lifestyle risk behaviors between US stroke survivors with and without diabetes. Results Prevalence and adjusted odds ratios for lifestyle risk behaviors were higher in respondents with diabetes compared with those without diabetes for consuming one or less fruit and one or less vegetable daily (58.8% vs. 53.7%, adjusted odds ratio = 1.14), physical inactivity (65.7% vs. 54.6%, adjusted odds ratio = 1.41), and overweight/obesity (87.2% vs. 63.1%, adjusted odds ratio = 2.42). Conclusions Prevalence of select lifestyle risk behaviors exceeds 50% in adults with stroke but is higher in adults with diabetes compared with adults without diabetes. Effective interventions, community programs, and healthcare policy are needed to promote lifestyle management in adults with stroke, particularly among those with diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)794-799
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume98
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

Keywords

  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Health
  • Health Risk Behavior
  • Stroke

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