Left ventricular pressure-volume diagrams and end-systolic pressure-volume relations in human beings

Raymond G. Mckay, Julian M. Aroesty, Gary V. Heller, Henry Royal, J. Anthony Parker, Kenneth J. Silverman, Gerald M. Kolodny, William Grossman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Assessment of left ventricular pressure-volume relations serially in response to altered loading conditions and heart rate has been difficult to achieve with contrast ventriculography. Accordingly, to study changing pressure-volume relations during altered loading and heart rate, left ventricular pressure and radionuclide absolute volume curves (obtained using a counts-based method with attenuation factor corrections) were recorded in 20 patients. Ventricular pressure and radionuclide volume curves vere digitized and synchronized to end-diastole, and pressure-volume plots were subsequently constructed from 32 pressure-volume coordinates throughout the cardiac cycle. In all patients, the correlation between radionuclide absolute volumes and angiographic ventricular volumes was r = 0.92. In 10 patients in whom both radionuclide and angiographic pressure-volume diagrams were constructed, the agreement between the two methods was excellent. With this method, end-systolic pressure-volume relations were examined during altered left ventricular loading conditions, pacing-induced incremental increases in heart rate and pacing-induced ischemia. Using pharmacologically induced changes in left ventricular loading conditions, the slope and volume intercept of the end-systolic pressure-volume line could be calculated as a means of assessing basal contractility. During pacing-induced tachycardia, the slope and volume intercept of the end-systolic pressure-volume line could be calculated to quantify the Treppe effect and assess negative inotropic changes secondary to ischemia. This study supports the validity of using serial recordings of left ventricular pressure and radionuclide volumes to assess left ventricular pressure-volume relations, and indicates that this approach may be useful in the analysis of end-systolic pressure-volume relations in patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-312
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Left ventricular pressure-volume diagrams and end-systolic pressure-volume relations in human beings'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this