Left ventricular dysfunction after prolonged strenuous exercise in healthy subjects

Douglas R. Seals, Marc A. Rogers, James M. Hagberg, Chikashi Yamamoto, Philip E. Cryer, Ali A. Ehsani

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Abstract

To determine whether depressed left ventricular (LV) contractile function can occur after prolonged and strenuous exercise, 12 healthy men, 26 ± 1 years old (mean ± standard error of the mean) were studied. The subjects exercised on a treadmill at 69 ± 1 % of maximal O2 uptake until exhaustion (170 ± 10 minutes). Hemodynamic variables were measured before and 10 minutes aftere exhausting exercise. Baseline systolic blood pressure decreased from 124 ± 2 to 113 ± 3 mm Hg (p < 0.001) after exhausting exercise. LV end-diastolic diameter, measured by echocardiography, decreased from 51 ± 1.0 to 47 ± 1.0 mm (p < 0.005) but LV end-systolic diameter did not change (34 ± 1.0 vs 34 ± 1.0 mm). Both LV fractional shortening and the mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening decreased (33 ± 1 vs 28 ± 1%; p <0.01 and 1.09 ± 0.4 vs 0.97 ± 0.05 circ/s; p < 0.025) despite a lower end-systolic wall stress (σes = 88 ± 4 vs 82 ± 5, × 103 dynes/ cm2; p <0.05) after prolonged exhausting exercise. A repeat bout of exercise of the same intensity but brief in duration (10 minutes) resulted in increases in LV fractional shortening (p <0.001) and mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (p < 0.001), and a decrease in LV end-diastolic diameter (50 ± 1.0 to 48 ± 1.0 mm; p <0.05) at heart rates comparable to those attained after prolonged exhausting exercise. The results suggest that prolonged strenuous exercise may result in impaired LV function in healthy young subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)875-879
Number of pages5
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume61
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 1988

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