Latent classifications of parental involvement in diabetes management for youth with type 1 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial

Chelsie D. Temmen, Ruijin Lu, Benjamin T. Gee, Zhen Chen, Tonja R. Nansel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Understanding how parent–child relationships influence diabetes management in youth with type 1 diabetes is critical for minimizing the risk of short- and long-term complications. We examined how classes of diabetes-specific parenting behaviors are associated with disease management and well-being for youth with type 1 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: The Family Management of Diabetes clinical trial tested the efficacy of a 2-year behavioral intervention for families of youth with type 1 diabetes. Three hundred and ninety youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and their primary caregiver were recruited from four pediatric endocrinology centers in the US Classifications of parental involvement utilized baseline parent and youth reports of task involvement, collaborative involvement, and parent–youth conflict. Class differences in baseline glycemic control (HbA1c), regimen adherence, general and diabetes quality of life, and depressive symptoms, and 2-year change in HbA1c were examined. Results: Latent profile analysis identified three classes: (1) high in task and collaborative involvement, low in conflict (Harmonious), (2) low in task involvement, collaborative involvement, and conflict (Indifferent), (3) high in task involvement and conflict, low in collaborative involvement (Inharmonious). The Harmonious group demonstrated the best adherence, glycemic control, and psychosocial well-being. The Inharmonious and Indifferent groups had similar diabetes management, but youth from Inharmonious families showed poorer psychosocial well-being. The intervention effect on glycemic control did not differ across the classes. Conclusions: The interplay of parental involvement and conflict resulted in distinct parenting classes that differed in disease management and well-being. However, the classes benefitted similarly from the behavioral intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1133-1142
Number of pages10
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • juvenile-onset diabetes
  • parent–child relationship
  • self-management
  • type 1 diabetes

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