Lack of access to specialists associated with mortality and preventable hospitalizations of rural medicare beneficiaries

Kenton J. Johnston, Hefei Wen, Karen E. Joynt Maddox

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

People living in rural areas have worse health outcomes than their urban counterparts do. Understanding what factors account for this could inform policy interventions for reducing rural-urban disparities in health. We examined a nationally representative survey of Medicare beneficiaries with one or more complex chronic conditions, which represented 61 percent of rural and 57 percent of urban Medicare beneficiaries. We found that rural residence was associated with a 40 percent higher preventable hospitalization rate and a 23 percent higher mortality rate, compared to urban residence. Having one or more specialist visits during the previous year was associated with a 15.9 percent lower preventable hospitalization rate and a 16.6 percent lower mortality rate for people with chronic conditions, after we controlled for having one or more primary care provider visits. Access to specialists accounted for 55 percent and 40 percent of the rural-urban difference in preventable hospitalizations and mortality, respectively. Medicare should consider interventions for rural beneficiaries who lack access to specialist care to reduce rural-urban disparities in health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1993-2002
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume38
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

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