Is There a Role for Isolated Closed Reduction in the Emergency Department Without Fixation for Displaced Proximal Humerus Fractures in Adolescents?

Beltran Torres-Izquierdo, Abhishek Tippabhatla, Keith Baldwin, Vidyadhar Upasani, Julia Sanders, Rachel Goldstein, Jaime Rice Denning, Pooya Hosseinzadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Pediatric proximal humerus fractures (PHFx) are uncommon and makeup ~2% of all pediatric fractures. Traditionally, most cases are treated nonoperatively with closed reduction (CR) or immobilization with no reduction (INR) with excellent outcomes. Indications for CR without fixation remain unclear as immobilization in the position of reduction (shoulder abduction and external rotation) is not practical. We aim to determine the need for CR among adolescents with displaced PHFx treated nonoperatively. Methods: We conducted an IRB-approved prospective multicenter study involving 42 adolescents aged 10 to 16 years, treated for displaced PHFx across 6 institutions between 2018 and 2022. CR was performed under conscious sedation in the emergency department, with data collected during follow-up visits at 6 weeks and 3 months. Radiographic measurements, range of motion, and patient-reported outcomes, including the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Upper Extremity and Physical Function, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and QuickDash scores, were compared between the INR and CR groups. Results: Among 42 fractures, 23 (55%) were treated with INR and 19 (45%) with CR, followed by placement in a hanging arm cast or sling. Of the cases, 62% were high-energy injuries. Radiographic alignment and range of motion were similar between groups at preoperative, 6 weeks, and 3 months with no significant differences noted. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Upper Extremity, Physical Function, QuickDash, and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index scores at 6 weeks and 3 months showed no significant differences between cohorts. Significant improvement was observed between 6 weeks and 3 months for every patient-reported outcome in both cohorts. Conclusions: For displaced PHFx treated nonoperatively, our data suggests INR has a similar radiographic and clinical outcome when compared with CR. Our results question the necessity of performing CR in this group of patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E310-E315
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2024

Keywords

  • pediatric upper extremity trauma
  • proximal humerus fracture
  • trauma
  • upper extremity

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