Investigation of food acceptability and feeding practices for lipid nutrient supplements and blended flours used to treat moderate malnutrition

Richard J. Wang, Indi Trehan, Lacey N. LaGrone, Ariana J. Weisz, Chrissie M. Thakwalakwa, Kenneth M. Maleta, Mark J. Manary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine acceptability and feeding practices associated with different supplementary food items and identify practices associated with weight gain. Methods: Caregivers (n = 409) whose children had been enrolled in a trial comparing a fortified corn-soy blended flour (CSB++), soy ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF), and soy/whey RUSF answered a questionnaire administered by health workers in their homes. Results: No significant differences in acceptability of food types were found. CSB++ was more likely than soy RUSF or soy/whey RUSF to be shared (21% vs 3% vs 8%, respectively, P < .001). Children who received soy/whey RUSF were more likely to feed themselves than children who received soy RUSF or CSB++ (11% vs 4% vs 3%, respectively, P < .05). Refusing food was associated with slower weight gain. Conclusions and Implications: Despite similar acceptability, feeding practices differed among food types. Increased nonstaple food consumption is associated with weight gain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-263
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition Education and Behavior
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Keywords

  • CSB++
  • Child
  • Moderate malnutrition
  • Ready-to-use food
  • Supplementary feeding

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