Introduction to biostatistics: Part 4, statistical inference techniques in hypothesis testing

Gary M. Gaddis, Monica L. Gaddis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Statistical methods used to test the null hypothesis are termed tests of significance. Selection of an appropriate test of significance is dependent on the type of data to be analyzed and the number of groups to be compared. Parametric tests of significance are based on the parameters, mean, standard deviation, and variance, and thus are used appropriately when interval or ratio data are analyzed. The t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) are examples of parametric tests of significance. Assumptions regarding the data to be analyzed when using the t-test or ANOVA include normality of the populations from which the sample data are drawn, homogeneity of the variances of the populations from which the sample data are drawn, and independence of the data points within a sample group. The t-test is the appropriate test of significance to use if there are only two groups to compare. If there are three or more groups to compare, ANOVA is the appropriate test. ANOVA holds the preset α level constant. While ANOVA will imply a significant difference between the groups compared, a multiple comparison test will define which of the three or more groups differ significantly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)820-825
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of emergency medicine
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1990

Keywords

  • biostatistics

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