Intraindividual variability in post-stroke cognition and its relationship with activities of daily living and social functioning: an ecological momentary assessment approach

Elizabeth G.S. Munsell, Quoc Bui, Katherine J. Kaufman, Stephanie E. Tomazin, Bridget A. Regan, Eric J. Lenze, Jin Moo Lee, David C. Mohr, Mandy W.M. Fong, Christopher L. Metts, Vy Pham, Alex W.K. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is a methodological approach to studying intraindividual variation over time. This study aimed to use EMA to determine the variability of cognition in individuals with chronic stroke, identify the latent classes of cognitive variability, and examine any differences in daily activities, social functioning, and neuropsychological performance between these latent classes. Methods: Participants (N = 202) with mild-to-moderate stroke and over 3-month post-stroke completed a study protocol, including smartphone-based EMA and two lab visits. Participants responded to five EMA surveys daily for 14 days to assess cognition. They completed patient-reported measures and neuropsychological assessments during lab visits. Using latent class analysis, we derived four indicators to quantify cognitive variability and identified latent classes among participants. We used ANOVA and Chi-square to test differences between these latent classes in daily activities, social functioning, and neuropsychological performance. Results: The latent class analysis converged on a three-class model. The moderate and high variability classes demonstrated significantly greater problems in daily activities and social functioning than the low class. They had significantly higher proportions of participants with problems in daily activities and social functioning than the low class. Neuropsychological performance was not statistically different between the three classes, although a trend approaching statistically significant difference was observed in working memory and executive function domains. Discussion: EMA could capture intraindividual cognitive variability in stroke survivors. It offers a new approach to understanding the impact and mechanism of post-stroke cognitive problems in daily life and identifying individuals benefiting from self-regulation interventions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTopics in stroke rehabilitation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Stroke
  • cognition
  • cognitive rehabilitation
  • cognitive variability
  • ecological momentary assessment
  • mobile health
  • remote assessment

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