Intimate Partner Violence, Minority Stress, and Sexual Risk-Taking Among U.S. Men Who Have Sex With Men

Catherine Finneran, Rob Stephenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) among a national sample of Internet-recruited U.S. men who have sex with men (MSM) (n = 1,575), and associations between reporting of IPV, minority stress, and sexual risk-taking. Five outcomes are examined: experiences of physical and sexual violence, perpetration of physical and sexual violence, and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) at last sexual encounter. MSM who reported experiencing more homophobic discrimination and internalized homophobia were more likely to report experiences of IPV. The results point to the need for prevention messages to address the external and internal stressors that influence both violence and sexual risk among MSM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-306
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • IPV, MSM

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