Interhospital Variation in the Costs of Pediatric/Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory Procedures: Analysis of Data From the Pediatric Health Information Systems Database

Michael L. O'Byrne, Andrew C. Glatz, Jennifer A. Faerber, Roopa Seshadri, Marisa E. Millenson, Lanyu Mi, Russell T. Shinohara, Yoav Dori, Matthew J. Gillespie, Jonathan J. Rome, Steven M. Kawut, Peter W. Groeneveld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Cardiac catheterization is an important but costly component of health care for young patients with cardiac disease. Measurement of variation in their cost between hospitals and identification of the reasons for this variation may help reduce cost without compromising quality. Methods and Results: Using data from Pediatric Health Information Systems Database from January 2007 to December 2015, the costs of 9 procedures were measured. Mixed-effects multivariable models were used to generate case-mix–adjusted estimates of each hospital's cost for each procedure and measure interhospital variation. Procedures (n=35 637) from 43 hospitals were studied. Median costs varied from $8249 (diagnostic catheterization after orthotopic heart transplantation) to $38 909 (transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement). There was marked variation in the cost of procedures between hospitals with 3.5- to 8.9-fold differences in the case-mix–adjusted cost between the most and least expensive hospitals. No significant correlation was found between hospitals’ procedure-specific mortality rates and costs. Higher procedure volume was not associated with lower cost except for diagnostic procedures in heart transplant patients and pulmonary artery angioplasty. At the hospital level, the proportion of cases that were outliers (>95th percentile) was significantly associated with rank in terms of cost (Spearman's ρ ranging from 0.37 to 0.89, P<0.01). Conclusions: Large-magnitude hospital variation in cost was not explained by case-mix or volume. Further research is necessary to determine the degree to which variation in cost is the result of differences in the efficiency of the delivery of healthcare services and the rate of catastrophic adverse outcomes and resultant protracted and expensive hospitalizations.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere011543
JournalJournal of the American Heart Association
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 2019

Keywords

  • congenital cardiac defect
  • congenital heart disease
  • cost
  • health services research
  • healthcare costs

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