Interaction between known risk factors for head and neck cancer and socioeconomic status: the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Study

Gaelen Stanford-Moore, Patrick T. Bradshaw, Mark C. Weissler, Jose P. Zevallos, Paul Brennan, Devasena Anantharaman, Behnoush Abedi-Ardekani, Andrew F. Olshan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior studies of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have explored the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) as an independent risk factor; however, none have investigated the interaction of known risk factors with SES. We examined this using the North Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Study, a population-based case–control study. Incident cases of SCCHN from North Carolina between 2002 and 2006 (n = 1,153) were identified and age, sex, and race-matched controls (n = 1,267) were selected from driver license records. SES measures included household income, educational attainment, and health insurance. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Current smoking was more strongly associated with SCCHN among those households making < $20,000/year [OR 5.11 (3.61–6.61)] compared to household incomes > $50,000/year [OR 2.47 (1.69–3.25); p interaction < 0.001]. Current drinking was more strongly associated with SCCHN in household incomes < $20,000 [OR 2.91 (2.05–3.78)] compared to > $50,000/year [1.28 (0.97–1.58); p interaction < 0.001]. Current drinkers with less than high school education or income < $20,000 had nearly threefold odds of never-drinkers in the same SES category [OR 2.91 (2.05–3.78); 2.09 (1.39–2.78), respectively]. Our results suggest that the relationship of smoking and alcohol use may be stronger among those of lower SES.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-873
Number of pages11
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume29
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Case–control studies
  • Epidemiology
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Risk factors
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Tobacco

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Interaction between known risk factors for head and neck cancer and socioeconomic status: the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this