Inpatient management of hypercalcemia portends a poor prognosis among gynecologic oncology patients: A trigger to initiate hospice care?

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Abstract

We aim to describe survival outcomes of gynecologic oncology inpatients treated with intravenous bisphosphonates for hypercalcemia and develop a risk stratification model that predicts decreased survival to aid with goals of care discussion. In a single-center, retrospective cohort study of gynecologic oncology patients admitted for bisphosphonate therapy for hypercalcemia. Survival from hypercalcemia to death was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Univariate log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to develop a risk stratification model. Sixty-five patients were evaluable with a median follow-up of 83.5 months. Mean age was 59.2 years, 64.6% had recurrent disease, and 30.8% had ≥2 previous lines of chemotherapy. Median survival was 38 days. Our analysis identified four risk factors (RFs) [brain metastasis, >1 site of metastasis, serum corrected peak calcium >12.4 (mg/dL), and peak ionized calcium >5.97 (mg/dL)] that predicted survival and were used to build a risk stratification score. Sum of RFs included 35 patients with 1 RF, 11 had 2 RFs, and 19 had ≥3 RF. Median survival for 1, 2, or ≥ 3 RFs was 53, 28, and 26 days respectively (p =.009). Survival at 6 months was 28.6%, 18.2%, and 5.3% for each group respectively. Hospice enrollment was 26.2%, and did not vary by group (p =.51). Among gynecologic oncology patients, inpatient management of hypercalcemia with bisphosphonates portends poor prognosis. Individualized risk stratification may help guide end-of-life discussions and identify patients who may benefit most from hospice care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalGynecologic Oncology Reports
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

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