Inhibitory action of epidermal growth factor on progesterone biosynthesis in hen granulosa cells during short term culture: Two sites of action

Debra D. Pulley, Babetta L. Marrone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The acute effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on progesterone biosynthesis by hen granulosa cells in short term culture was investigated. Pretreatment of cells for 5 h with EGF at concentrations of 1000–4000 ng/ml inhibited LHstimulated progesterone production by 54%. Shorter EGF pretreatment times of 1 and 3 h caused 25% and 35% inhibition of LH-stimulated progesterone production, respectively. In additional experiments, EGF was found to inhibit progesterone production in response to 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM) and forskolin (100 μM) by 34% and 35%, respectively. EGF had no effect on the conversion of 25-hydroxy-cholesterol or preghenolone to progesterone, indicating that one site at which EGF inhibits progesterone biosynthesis is distal to cAMP generation, but before the side-chain cleavage step. EGF also inhibited LHstimulated cAMP production by 32%, but had no effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. This indicated that there was a second site of EGF action in these cells, probably at the level of LH receptor coupling to the adenylate cyclase. Nerve growth factor (4000 ng/ml) had no effect on progesterone production, but fibroblast growth factor (4000 ng/ml) facilitated LH-stimulated progesterone production. The results demonstrate that the acute inhibitory effect of EGF on LH-stimulated progesterone biosynthesis in hen granulosa cells is due to its action at two sites: One at a site before the production of cAMP and the other at a step beyond cAMP generation.).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2284-2291
Number of pages8
JournalEndocrinology
Volume118
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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