Inhibition of ischemic cardiomyocyte apoptosis through targeted ablation of Bnip3 restrains postinfarction remodeling in mice

Abhinav Diwan, Maike Krenz, Faisal M. Syed, Janaka Wansapura, Xiaoping Ren, Andrew G. Koesters, Hairong Li, Lorrie A. Kirshenbaum, Harvey S. Hahn, Jeffrey Robbins, W. Keith Jones, Gerald W. Dorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

203 Scopus citations

Abstract

Following myocardial infarction, nonischemic myocyte death results in infarct expansion, myocardial loss, and ventricular dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that a specific proapoptotic gene, Bnip3, minimizes ventricular remodeling in the mouse, despite having no effect on early or late infarct size. We evaluated the effects of ablating Bnip3 on cardiomyocyte death, infarct size, and ventricular remodeling after surgical ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in mice. Immediately following IR, no significant differences were observed between Bnip3-/- and WT mice. However, at 2 days after IR, apoptosis was diminished in Bnip3-/- periinfarct and remote myocardium, and at 3 weeks after IR, Bnip3-/- mice exhibited preserved LV systolic performance, diminished LV dilation, and decreased ventricular sphericalization. These results suggest myocardial salvage by inhibition of apoptosis. Forced cardiac expression of Bnip3 increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis in unstressed mice, causing progressive LV dilation and diminished systolic function. Conditional Bnip3 overexpression prior to coronary ligation increased apoptosis and infarct size. These studies identify postischemic apoptosis by myocardial Bnip3 as a major determinant of ventricular remodeling in the infarcted heart, suggesting that Bnip3 may be an attractive therapeutic target.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2825-2833
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume117
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

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