Infrared scanning near-field optical microscopy investigates order and clusters in model membranes

J. Generosi, G. Margaritondo, J. S. Sanghera, I. D. Aggarwal, N. H. Tolk, D. W. Piston, A. Congiu Castellano, A. Cricenti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Due to its surface sensitivity and high spatial resolution, scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) has a significant potential to study the lateral organization of membrane domains and clusters. Compared to other techniques, infrared near-field microscopy in the spectroscopic mode has the advantage to be sensitive to specific chemical bonds. In fact, spectroscopic SNOM in the infrared spectral range (IR-SNOM) reveals the chemical content of the sample with a lateral resolution around 100 nm (Cricenti et al., 1998a, 1998b, 2003). Model lipid membranes were studied by IR-SNOM at several wavelengths. Topographical micrographs reveal the presence of islands at the surface and the optical images indicate the formation of locally ordered multiple bilayers - both critically important features for biotechnology and medical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-263
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Microscopy
Volume229
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

Keywords

  • Lipid bilayers
  • Membranes
  • Scanning near-field optical microscopy

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