Influence des séquelles neurologiques, de l’aphasie et de l’anxiété sur la perception des AVQ et AIVQ

Translated title of the contribution: Self-Perceived ADL/IADL Function is Influenced by Residual Neurological Impairment, Aphasia, and Anxiety

Ashley R. Juniper, Lisa Tabor Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background.: Self-perceptions of performance of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are reduced following stroke. Research investigating contributing factors is lacking. Purpose.: We examined the extent to which aphasia status, neurological impairment and poststroke depression, and anxiety contribute to self-perceived ADL/IADL function. Method.: Seventy-six community-dwelling individuals at least 6 months poststroke, 44 with and 32 without aphasia, participated in the cross-sectional study. The Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) ADL/IADL domain was the primary outcome measure with aphasia status, residual neurological impairment, depressive symptoms, and anxiety as predictor variables. Findings: Aphasia status, residual neurological impairment, and anxiety were independent predictors of self-perceived ADL/IADL function, together accounting for more than half the variance. Depression was not associated with ADL/IADL. Implications.: Clinician awareness of the influence of anxiety on self-perceived ADL/IADL function, particularly for people with aphasia, may lead to future interventions that improve self-perceived ADL/IADL function.

Translated title of the contributionSelf-Perceived ADL/IADL Function is Influenced by Residual Neurological Impairment, Aphasia, and Anxiety
Original languageFrench
JournalCanadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Activities of daily living
  • Anxiety
  • Community
  • Instrumental activities of daily living
  • Stroke

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