In vitro reconstitution reveals major differences between human and bacterial cytochrome c synthases

Molly C. Sutherland, Deanna L. Mendez, Shalon E. Babbitt, Dustin E. Tillman, Olga Melnikov, Nathan L. Tran, Noah T. Prizant, Andrea L. Collier, Robert G. Kranz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cytochromes c are ubiquitous heme proteins in mitochondria and bacteria, all possessing a CXXCH (CysXxxXxxCysHis) motif with covalently attached heme. We describe the first in vitro reconstitution of cytochrome c biogenesis using purified mitochondrial (HCCS) and bacterial (CcsBA) cytochrome c synthases. We employ apocytochrome c and peptide analogs containing CXXCH as substrates, examining recognition determinants, thioether attachment, and subsequent release and folding of cytochrome c. Peptide analogs reveal very different recognition requirements between HCCS and CcsBA. For HCCS, a minimal 16-mer peptide is required, comprised of CXXCH and adjacent alpha helix 1, yet neither thiol is critical for recognition. For bacterial CcsBA, both thiols and histidine are required, but not alpha helix 1. Heme attached peptide analogs are not released from the HCCS active site; thus, folding is important in the release mechanism. Peptide analogs behave as inhibitors of cytochrome c biogenesis, paving the way for targeted control.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere64891
JournaleLife
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

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