Improving cervical cancer survival–A multifaceted strategy to sustain progress for this global problem

Stephanie Markovina, Katharine A. Rendle, Alexander C. Cohen, Lindsay M. Kuroki, Surbhi Grover, Julie K. Schwarz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Cervical cancer is associated with profound socioeconomic and racial disparities in incidence, mortality, morbidity, and years of life lost. The last standard-of-care treatment innovation for locally advanced cervical cancer occurred in 1999, when cisplatin chemotherapy was added to pelvic radiation therapy (chemoradiation therapy). Chemoradiation therapy is associated with a 30%–50% failure rate, and there is currently no cure for recurrent or metastatic disease. The enormity of the worldwide clinical problem of cervical cancer morbidity and mortality as well as the egregiously unchanged mortality rate over the last several decades are recognized by the National Institutes of Health as urgent priorities. This is reflected within the Office of Research on Women's Health effort to advance National Institutes of Health research on the health of women, as highlighted in a recent symposium. In the current review, the authors address the state of the science and opportunities to improve cervical cancer survival with an emphasis on improving access, using technology in innovative and widely implementable ways, and improving current understanding of cervical cancer biology. Lay summary: Cervical cancer is associated with profound socioeconomic and racial disparities in incidence, mortality, morbidity, and years of life lost. In this review, the state of the science and opportunities to improve cervical cancer survival are presented with an emphasis on improving access, using technology in innovative and widely implementable ways, and improving current understanding of cervical cancer biology.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCancer
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • cancer
  • cervical
  • chemoradiation
  • human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • immunotherapy

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