Improving cervical cancer screening rates in an urban HIV clinic

Sara L. Cross, Sanaa H. Suharwardy, Phani Bodavula, Kenneth Schechtman, E. Turner Overton, Nur F. Onen, Michael A. Lane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer; however, screening rates remain low. The objectives of this study were to analyze a quality improvement intervention to increase cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic and to identify factors associated with inadequate screening. Barriers to screening were identified by a multidisciplinary quality improvement committee at the Washington University Infectious Diseases clinic. Several strategies were developed to address these barriers. The years pre-and post-implementation were analyzed to examine the clinical impact of the intervention. A total of 422 women were seen in both the pre-implementation and post-implementation periods. In the pre-implementation period, 222 women (53%) underwent cervical cancer screening in the form of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing. In the post-implementation period, 318 women (75.3%) underwent cervical cancer screening (p < 0.01). Factors associated with lack of screening included fewer visits attended (pre: 4.2 ± 1.5; post: 3.4 ± 1.4; p < 0.01). A multidisciplinary quality improvement intervention was successful in overcoming barriers and increasing cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1186-1193
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2 2014

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • cervical cancer screening
  • health maintenance
  • quality improvement

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