Implications of Concomitant Tricuspid Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerated Surgical Aortic Bioprosthesis: Insights From the PARTNER 2 Aortic Valve-in-Valve Registry

Janarthanan Sathananthan, Dale J. Murdoch, Brian R. Lindman, Alan Zajarias, Wael A. Jaber, Paul Cremer, David Wood, Robert Moss, Anson Cheung, Jian Ye, Rebecca T. Hahn, Aaron Crowley, Martin B. Leon, Michael J. Mack, John G. Webb

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the implications of concomitant tricuspid regurgitation (TR) in patients undergoing valve-in-valve (VIV) transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Background: Patients undergoing VIV transcatheter aortic valve replacement with concomitant TR may have worse outcomes, and optimal management remains undetermined. Methods: The multicenter PARTNER 2 (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves) VIV trial enrolled patients with symptomatic degenerated surgical aortic bioprostheses who were at high risk for reoperation. Outcomes were assessed between patients with mild or no TR versus moderate or severe TR. Results: A total of 237 patients underwent VIV procedures (mean age 78.7 ± 10.8 years, mean Society of Thoracic Surgeons score 9.1 ± 4.8%). In this cohort, 162 patients (68.4%) had mild or no TR, and 75 patients (31.6%) had moderate or severe TR. Although there was no difference in New York Heart Association functional class III or IV symptomatic status (89.3% vs. 91.4%; p = 0.62) or moderate or severe right ventricular dysfunction (9.4% vs. 16.9%; p = 0.11), patients with moderate or severe TR were more likely to be at high surgical risk, with a Society of Thoracic Surgeons score of >8 (62.7% vs 46.9%; p = 0.02). There was no difference in a composite endpoint of death and rehospitalization between moderate or severe TR and mild or no TR, either at 30 days (10.7% vs. 9.9%; p = 0.85) or at 1-year follow-up (24.1% vs. 23.2%; p = 0.80). There was a significant reduction in overall moderate or severe TR from baseline at 30 days (31.1% vs. 21.1%; p = 0.002), which was sustained at 1-year follow-up (38.0% vs. 22.8%; p = 0.004). Conclusions: Despite higher predicted surgical risk, the presence of TR was not a predictor of long-term outcomes. Importantly, there was significant reduction in TR severity at both short- and long-term follow-up. In selected patients undergoing VIV transcatheter aortic valve replacement, it may be appropriate to conservatively manage concomitant TR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1154-1160
Number of pages7
JournalJACC: Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 25 2018

Keywords

  • aortic bioprosthesis
  • transcatheter aortic valve replacement
  • valve-in-valve

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    Sathananthan, J., Murdoch, D. J., Lindman, B. R., Zajarias, A., Jaber, W. A., Cremer, P., Wood, D., Moss, R., Cheung, A., Ye, J., Hahn, R. T., Crowley, A., Leon, M. B., Mack, M. J., & Webb, J. G. (2018). Implications of Concomitant Tricuspid Regurgitation in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement for Degenerated Surgical Aortic Bioprosthesis: Insights From the PARTNER 2 Aortic Valve-in-Valve Registry. JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions, 11(12), 1154-1160. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcin.2018.03.019