Implanted vascular access device options: a focused review on safety and outcomes

Merilda O. Blanco-Guzman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Implantable vascular access devices are frequently used in patients who have poor peripheral venous access. These devices can be partially implanted as tunneled and nontunneled central catheters, or they can be fully implanted as ports. Compared with long-term catheters, implanted ports have lower infection rates and improved perceptions of quality of life, but complications still occur in 2% to 18% of patients, frequently requiring removal of the device. Since the conception of implantable vascular access device ports, numerous advances in port design, materials, and techniques for implantation and care have been developed with the goal of overcoming frequent complications. We review the evidence related to these advances and their effect on the safety profile and complications of implantable vascular access device ports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)558-568
Number of pages11
JournalTransfusion
Volume58
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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