Impaired non-motor learning and error detection associated with cerebellar damage: A single case study

Julie A. Fiez, Steven E. Petersen, Marshall K. Cheney, Marcus E. Raichle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

453 Scopus citations

Abstract

A previously conducted positron emission tomography (PET) study of normal humans suggested that the cerebellum makes important non-motor contributions to language processing. Beginning with the task which produced right cerebellar PET activation, we studied a 49-yr-old male (RC1) with right cerebellar damage on a variety of tasks involving complex non-motor processing. Whereas RC1's performance on standard tests of memory, intelligence, 'frontal function' and language skills was excellent, he had profound deficits in two areas: (1) practice-related learning; (2) detection of errors. Considered in relation to cerebellar contributions to motor tasks, the results suggest some functions performed by the cerebellum may be generalized beyond a purely motor domain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)155-178
Number of pages24
JournalBrain
Volume115
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1992

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