Impact of Semi-Annual Albendazole on Lymphatic Filariasis and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: Parasitological Assessment after 14 Rounds of Community Treatment

Sébastien D.S. Pion, Cédric B. Chesnais, Gary J. Weil, Frédéric Louya, Michel Boussinesq, François Missamou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Between October 2012 and October 2015, we conducted a community trial to assess the impact of semi-annual (twice yearly) community treatment with albendazole on lymphatic filariasis in Seke Pembe, a village in the Republic of the Congo. Semi-annual community treatment with albendazole has been continued in the community since October 2015. We conducted an additional parasitological assessment survey in October 2019, 6 months after the 14th round of semi-annual treatment. Between October 2012 and October 2015, Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia and microfilaremia rates in the community had decreased from 17.3%to 4.7%and from 5.3%to 0.3%, respectively. In October 2019, the antigenemia rate had decreased further to 2.8% (19 of 687). No microfilariae were found in night blood smears from persons with circulating filarial antigenemia (0 of 16), suggesting that W. bancrofti transmission has been interrupted in Seke Pembe. Semi-annual albendazole treatments also reduced significantly infection rates with soiltransmitted helminths.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)729-731
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume106
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

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