Identification of critical residues involved in ligand binding and G protein signaling in human somatostatin receptor subtype 2

Jesse J. Parry, Ronald Chen, Rebecca Andrews, Kimberly A. Lears, Buck E. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

G protein signaling through human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) is well known, but the amino acids involved in stimulation of intracellular responses upon ligand binding have not been characterized. We constructed a series of point mutants in SSTR2 at amino acid positions 89, 139, and 140 in attempts to disrupt G protein signaling upon ligand binding. The aspartic acid changes at position 89 to either Ala, Leu, or Arg generated mutant receptors with varying expression profiles and a complete inability to bind somatostatin-14 (SST). Mutations to Asp 139 and Arg 140 also led to varying expression profiles with some mutants maintaining their affinity for SST. Mutation of Arg 140 to Ala resulted in a mutated receptor that had a B max and dissociation constant (K d) similar to wild-type receptor but was still coupled to the G protein as determined in both a cAMP assay and a calcium-release assay. In contrast, mutation of Asp 139 to Asn resulted in a mutated receptor with B max and K d values that were similar to wild type but was uncoupled from G protein-mediated cAMP signaling, but not calcium release. Thus, we identified mutations in SSTR2 that result in either receptor expression levels that are similar to wild type but is completely ablated for ligand binding or a receptor that maintains affinity for SST and is uncoupled from G protein-mediated cAMP signaling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2747-2755
Number of pages9
JournalEndocrinology
Volume153
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

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