Hyaluronic acid regulates normal intestinal and colonic growth in mice

Terrence E. Riehl, Xueping Ee, William F. Stenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, affects gastrointestinal epithelial proliferation in injury models, but its role in normal growth is unknown. We sought to determine the effects of exogenous HA on intestinal and colonic growth by intraperitoneal injection of HA twice a week into C57BL/6 mice from 3 to 8 wk of age. Similarly, to determine the effects of endogenous HA on intestinal and colonic growth, we administered PEP-1, a peptide that blocks the binding of HA to its receptors, on the same schedule. In mice treated with exogenous HA, villus height and crypt depth in the intestine, crypt depth in the colon, and epithelial proliferation in the intestine and colon were increased. In mice treated with PEP-1, intestinal and colonic length were markedly decreased and crypt depth and villus height in the intestine, crypt depth in the colon, and epithelial proliferation in the intestine and colon were decreased. Administration of HA was associated with increased levels of EGF (intestine) and IGF-I (colon), whereas administration of PEP-1 was associated with decreased levels of IGF-I (intestine) and epiregulin (colon). Exogenous HA increases intestinal and colonic epithelial proliferation, resulting in hyperplasia. Blocking the binding of endogenous HA to its receptors results in decreased intestinal and colonic length and a mucosal picture of hypoplasia, suggesting that endogenous HA contributes to the regulation of normal intestinal and colonic growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)G377-G388
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume303
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Keywords

  • Hyaluronic acid synthase
  • PEP-1

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hyaluronic acid regulates normal intestinal and colonic growth in mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this