Human Anti-neuraminidase Antibodies Reduce Airborne Transmission of Clinical Influenza Virus Isolates in the Guinea Pig Model

Jessica Tan, George O'Dell, Matthew M. Hernandez, Emilia Mia Sordillo, Zenab Kahn, Divya Kriti, Harm van Bakel, Ali H. Ellebedy, Patrick C. Wilson, Viviana Simon, Florian Krammer, Meagan McMahon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The public health burden caused by influenza virus infections is not adequately addressed with existing vaccines and antivirals. Identifying approaches that interfere with human-to-human transmission of influenza viruses remains a pressing need. The importance of neuraminidase (NA) activity for the replication and spread of influenza viruses led us to investigate whether broadly reactive human anti-NA monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) could affect airborne transmission of the virus using the guinea pig model. In that model, infection with recent influenza virus clinical isolates resulted in 100% transmission from inoculated donors to recipients in an airborne transmission setting. Anti-NA MAbs were administered either to the inoculated animals on days 1, 2, and 4 after infection or to the naive contacts on days 2 and 4 after donor infection. Administration of NA-1G01, a broadly cross-reactive anti-NA MAb, to either the donor or recipient reduced transmission of the A/New York City/PV02669/2019 (H1N1) and A/New York City/PV01148/2018 (H3N2) viruses. Administration of 1000-3C05, an anti-N1 MAb, to either the donor or recipient reduced transmission of A/New York City/PV02669/2019 (H1N1) virus but did not reduce transmission of A/New York City/PV01148 (H3N2) virus. Conversely, 229-2C06, an anti-N2 MAb, reduced transmission of A/New York City/PV01148 (H3N2) but did not impact transmission of A/New York City/PV02669/2019 (H1N1) virus. Our work demonstrates that anti-NA MAbs could be further developed into prophylactic or therapeutic agents to prevent influenza virus transmission to control viral spread.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere01421-21
JournalJournal of virology
Volume96
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Guinea pig
  • Influenza
  • NA antibodies
  • Transmission

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