Housing characteristics, home environmental factors, and pulmonary function deficit in Chinese children: Results from the Seven Northeast Cities (SNEC) study

Brett Emo, Li Wen Hu, Bo Yi Yang, Kahee A. Mohammed, Christian Geneus, Michael Vaughn, Zhengmin Qian, Guang Hui Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To assess the effects of housing characteristics and home environmental factors on lung function of Chinese children, 6740 children (aged 6–16 years) were recruited from seven cities in Northeast China in 2012. Performance of lung function was determined by comparison of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximal mid-expiratory flow (MMEF). Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the associations with lung function deficit. The results showed that housing conditions were associated with lung function deficit in children. The adjusted odds ratios were 0.47 (95% CI: 0.26–0.83) for FVC for “ping-fang” housing compared with “dan-yuan-lou-fang” housing and 2.90 (95% CI: 2.43–3.47) for FEV1 with home renovations completed within two years compared with counterparts. The linear regression models consistently showed a significant association of housing conditions and home environmental factors with lung function measurements across subjects. A residence taller than seven stories was negatively associated with FEV1 (β = −55; 95% CI: −97 to −13). In conclusion, housing conditions and home environmental factors are particularly important to the development of lung function and respiratory health in children. These factors are concerning and action should be taken to improve them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-259
Number of pages18
JournalFacets
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Keywords

  • Children
  • China
  • Home environment
  • Housing characteristics
  • Lung function

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