Hemodynamic directed CPR improves short-term survival from asphyxia-associated cardiac arrest

Robert M. Sutton, Stuart H. Friess, Utpal Bhalala, Matthew R. Maltese, Maryam Y. Naim, George Bratinov, Dana Niles, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Lance B. Becker, Robert A. Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

61 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: Adequate coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is essential for establishing return of spontaneous circulation. The objective of this study was to compare short-term survival using a hemodynamic directed resuscitation strategy versus an absolute depth-guided approach in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that a hemodynamic directed approach would improve short-term survival compared to depth-guided care. Methods: After 7. min of asphyxia, followed by induction of ventricular fibrillation, 19 female 3-month old swine (31 ± 0.4. kg) were randomized to receive one of three resuscitation strategies: (1) hemodynamic directed care (CPP-20): chest compressions (CCs) with depth titrated to a target systolic blood pressure of 100. mmHg and titration of vasopressors to maintain CPP > 20. mmHg; (2) depth 33. mm (D33): target CC depth of 33. mm with standard American Heart Association (AHA) epinephrine dosing; or (3) depth 51. mm (D51): target CC depth of 51. mm with standard AHA epinephrine dosing. All animals received manual CPR guided by audiovisual feedback for 10. min before first shock. Results: 45-Min survival was higher in the CPP-20 group (6/6) compared to D33 (1/7) or D51 (1/6) groups; p= 0.002. Coronary perfusion pressures were higher in the CPP-20 group compared to D33 (p= 0.011) and D51 (p= 0.04), and in survivors compared to non-survivors (p< 0.01). Total number of vasopressor doses administered and defibrillation attempts were not different. Conclusions: Hemodynamic directed care targeting CPPs > 20. mmHg improves short-term survival in an intensive care unit porcine model of asphyxia-associated cardiac arrest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)696-701
Number of pages6
JournalResuscitation
Volume84
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • AHA
  • Asphyxia
  • CC
  • CPP
  • Cardiac arrest
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Coronary perfusion pressure
  • ETCO
  • Hypoxia

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Hemodynamic directed CPR improves short-term survival from asphyxia-associated cardiac arrest'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this