Health care expenditures for university and academic medical center employees enrolled in a pilot workplace health partner intervention

Kenton J. Johnston, Jason M. Hockenberry, Kimberly J. Rask, Lynn Cunningham, Kenneth L. Brigham, Greg S. Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the impact of a pilot workplace health partner intervention delivered by a predictive health institute to university and academic medical center employees on per-member, per-month health care expenditures. Methods: We analyzed the health care claims of participants versus nonparticipants, with a 12-month baseline and 24-month intervention period. Total per-member, per-month expenditures were analyzed using two-part regression models that controlled for sex, age, health benefit plan type, medical member months, and active employment months. Results: Our regression results found no statistical differences in total expenditures at baseline and intervention. Further sensitivity analyses controlling for high cost outliers, comorbidities, and propensity to be in the intervention group confirmed these findings. Conclusions: We find no difference in health care expenditures attributable to the health partner intervention. The intervention does not seem to have raised expenditures in the short term.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)897-903
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume57
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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