Genomic divergence during feralization reveals both conserved and distinct mechanisms of parallel weediness evolution

Toshiyuki Imaizumi, Kaworu Ebana, Yoshihiro Kawahara, Chiaki Muto, Hiroyuki Kobayashi, Akira Koarai, Kenneth M. Olsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Agricultural weeds are the most important biotic constraints to global crop production, and chief among these is weedy rice. Despite increasing yield losses from weedy rice in recent years worldwide, the genetic basis of weediness evolution remains unclear. Using whole-genome sequence analyses, we examined the origins and adaptation of Japanese weedy rice. We find evidence for a weed origin from tropical japonica crop ancestry, which has not previously been documented in surveys of weedy rice worldwide. We further show that adaptation occurs largely through different genetic mechanisms between independently-evolved temperate japonica- and tropical japonica-derived strains; most genomic signatures of positive selection are unique within weed types. In addition, some weedy rice strains have evolved through hybridization between weedy and cultivated rice with adaptive introgression from the crop. Surprisingly, introgression from cultivated rice confers not only crop-like adaptive traits (such as shorter plant height, facilitating crop mimicry) but also weedy-like traits (such as seed dormancy). These findings reveal how hybridization with cultivated rice can promote persistence and proliferation of weedy rice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number952
JournalCommunications Biology
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Genomic divergence during feralization reveals both conserved and distinct mechanisms of parallel weediness evolution'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this