Genetic variants are not associated with outcome in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction: Results of the genetic substudy of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trials

Arthur M. Feldman, Lilin She, Dennis M. McNamara, Douglas L. Mann, Michael R. Bristow, Alan S. Maisel, Daniel R. Wagner, Bert Andersson, Luigi Chiariello, Christopher S. Hayward, Paul Hendry, John D. Parker, Normand Racine, Craig H. Selzman, Michele Senni, Janina Stepinska, Marian Zembala, Jean Rouleau, Eric J. Velazquez, Kerry L. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives and Background: We evaluated the ability of 23 genetic variants to provide prognostic information in patients enrolled in the Genetic Substudy of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trials. Methods: Patients assigned to STICH Hypothesis 1 were randomized to medical therapy with or without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Those assigned to STICH Hypothesis 2 were randomized to CABG or CABG with left ventricular reconstruction. Results: In patients assigned to STICH Hypothesis 2 (n = 714), no genetic variant met the prespecified Bonferroni-adjusted threshold for statistical significance (p < 0.002); however, several variants met nominal prognostic significance: variants in the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (β2-AR Gln27Glu) and in the A1-adenosine receptor gene (A1-717 T/G) were associated with an increased risk of a subject dying or being hospitalized for a cardiac problem (p = 0.027 and 0.031, respectively). These relationships remained nominally significant even after multivariable adjustment for prognostic clinical variables. However, none of the 23 genetic variants influenced all-cause mortality or the combination of death or cardiovascular hospitalization in the STICH Hypothesis 1 population (n = 532) by either univariate or multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We were unable to identify the predictive genotypes in optimally treated patients in these two ischemic heart failure populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-81
Number of pages13
JournalCardiology (Switzerland)
Volume130
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 2015

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Genotype
  • Heart failure

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Genetic variants are not associated with outcome in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction: Results of the genetic substudy of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trials'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this