Genetic and environmental factors in primary dysmenorrhea and its relationship to anxiety, depression, and neuroticism

J. L. Silberg, N. G. Martin, A. C. Heath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Over 1200 pairs of female monozygotic and dizygotic twins with regular menses reported on the amount of flow, severity of pain, and degree of limitation experienced during menstruation. Fifty-two percent of the women reported moderate or severe menstrual pain and these reports were fairly repeatable (0.62-0.80) over a 3-month interval. Heritabilities were 0.22 for flow, 0.38 for pain, and 0.36 for limitation. Covariations between menstrual symptoms and the symptoms and personality variables of state anxiety and depression and trait neuroticism were shown to be almost entirely genetic in origin. There was also gene action specifically affecting menstrual pain and also menstrual flow, but genetic variation in limitation was entirely due to genes also affecting flow, pain, and personality variables-neuroticism in particular.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-383
Number of pages21
JournalBehavior genetics
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • depression
  • genetics
  • neuroticism
  • primary dysmenorrhea
  • twins

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Genetic and environmental factors in primary dysmenorrhea and its relationship to anxiety, depression, and neuroticism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this