Gene correction reduces cutaneous inflammation and granuloma formation in murine X-linked chronic granulomatous disease

W. Scott Goebel, Lawrence A. Mark, Steven D. Billings, Justin L. Meyers, Nancy Pech, Jeffrey B. Travers, Mary C. Dinauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our laboratory previously demonstrated that X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) mice develop exaggerated inflammatory responses and form granulomas following intradermal challenge with sterile Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) hyphae. In this study, we examined the efficacy of retroviral-mediated gene transfer (RMGT) into X-CGD bone marrow stem cells in preventing this abnormal inflammatory response. Sterile AF or saline was injected subcutaneously into the ears of wild-type, female X-CGD carrier, X-CGD, or X-CGD mice chimeric for varying numbers of either wild-type or RMGT-corrected neutrophils. Intradermal AF induced marked inflammation at both 3 and 30 d in the X-CGD mice, but not in the carriers or the wild-type mice. Similar to wild-type mice, chimeric X-CGD mice with >20% oxidase-positive neutrophils displayed a minimal and self-limited inflammatory response. Inflammation in chimeric (both wild-type and RMGT-corrected) mice with <15% oxidase-positive neutrophils was also improved compared to X-CGD mice, although still abnormal. This is the first evidence that partial correction of NADPH oxidase activity by gene therapy is likely to be beneficial in reducing or preventing the chronic inflammatory complications of CGD patients if sufficient numbers of RMGT-corrected neutrophils are obtained.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)705-710
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume125
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chronic granulomatous disease
  • Inflammation
  • Neutrophil
  • Skin
  • Transgenic knockout

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