Field applicability of a rapid-format anti-Ov-16 antibody test for the assessment of onchocerciasis control measures in regions of endemicity

Ettie M. Lipner, Noumouza Dembele, Sanou Souleymane, William Soumbey Alley, D. Rebecca Prevots, Laurent Toe, Boayke Boatin, Gary J. Weil, Thomas B. Nutman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. A previously developed, specific, rapid-format immunochromatographic card test that detects immunoglobulin G4 to the recombinant Onchocerca volvulus antigen Ov-16 was modified to detect antibodies in whole blood. Methods. Ov-16 card test results were assessed in 1511 subjects ≥ 2 years of age in 7 West African villages with varying histories of onchocerciasis control measures. Results. In villages in which control measures had been implemented, anti-Ov-16 antibody prevalence rates ranged from 5.2% to 65.1%. Antibody prevalence rates were close to zero among subjects born after effective control measures had been implemented. In 2 villages without a history of control measures where onchocerciasis was endemic, microfilariae (MF) prevalence rates were 82.8% and 65.1%, and antibody prevalence rates were 73.1% and 62.1%. In these 2 villages, the sensitivity of the Ov-16 card test was 81.1% and 76.5%, the specificity was 100%, and the positive predictive value was 91.8% and 80.5%. MF and antibody prevalence rates were correlated (Spearman's r = 0.815; P < .038). Conclusions. The Ov-16 card test is field applicable, exhibits high sensitivity and specificity for O. volvulus infection, and has great potential as a tool for surveillance and for evaluating the success of onchocerciasis control measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-221
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume194
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2006

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Field applicability of a rapid-format anti-Ov-16 antibody test for the assessment of onchocerciasis control measures in regions of endemicity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this