Fenestrate what you can't Snorkel?

Mohamed A. Zayed, Mohammed Chowdhury, Kevin Casey, Ronald L. Dalman, Jason T. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Although challenging proximal necks have limited the utility of standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) devices, sophisticated endovascular techniques have evolved in recent years for the repair of juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Among these techniques, snorkel or chimney EVAR (sn-EVAR) and fenestrated EVAR (f-EVAR) have emerged as options for repairing anatomic high-risk AAAs. Unfortunately, in the United States, except in the context of a clinical trial or physician-sponsored device exemption, limited long-term data exist on the treatment of juxta- and suprarenal AAAs with either sn-EVAR or f-EVAR. Owing to these limitations, comparison of these two techniques is challenging, and we sought to describe a case when one was favored over the other. Methods and Results: A 72-year-old man presented with an enlarging, asymptomatic, juxtarenal fusiform AAA (5.9 cm), a moderately enlarged right common iliac artery (2.8 cm), a history of oxygen-dependent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and a previous right nephrectomy. An initial sn-EVAR was attempted but was unsuccessful owing to the inability to deliver the "snorkel" covered stent via a brachial approach because of renal ostial stenosis and cephalad angulation of the patient's left renal artery. A subsequent f-EVAR approach was successfully used to repair the juxtarenal AAA while preserving adequate renal artery blood flow. Two-year postoperative follow-up demonstrated a stable endovascular repair without endoleaks, a shrinking aneurysm sac, and stable renal function. Conclusion: The sn-EVAR configuration in this case report was precluded by cephalad renal angulation, and the AAA was instead repaired using an f-EVAR approach, with good 2-year follow-up outcomes. The sn-EVAR strategy requires downward pointing renal arteries in addition to adequate brachial/axillary artery access dimensions to facilitate successful repair. With improving techniques and technology for either approach, anatomic specifications and indications for these advanced EVAR strategies will need to be delineated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)731.e15-731.e22
JournalAnnals of Vascular Surgery
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fenestrate what you can't Snorkel?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Zayed, M. A., Chowdhury, M., Casey, K., Dalman, R. L., & Lee, J. T. (2012). Fenestrate what you can't Snorkel? Annals of Vascular Surgery, 26(5), 731.e15-731.e22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.avsg.2011.08.027