Feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a telerehabilitation approach to group adapted tango instruction for people with Parkinson disease

Katie J. Seidler, Ryan P. Duncan, Marie E. McNeely, Madeleine E. Hackney, Gammon M. Earhart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

People with Parkinson disease (PD) demonstrate improvements in motor function following group tango classes, but report long commutes as a barrier to participation. To increase access, we investigated a telerehabilitation approach to group tango instruction. Twenty-six people with mild-to-moderate PD were assigned based on commute distance to either the telerehabilitation group (Telerehab) or an in-person instruction group (In-person). Both groups followed the same twice-weekly, 12-week curriculum with the same instructor. Feasibility metrics were participant retention, attendance and adverse events. Outcomes assessed were balance, PD motor sign severity and gait. Participant retention was 85% in both groups. Attendance was 87% in the Telerehab group and 84% in the In-person group. No adverse events occurred. Balance and motor sign severity improved significantly over time (p < 0.001) in both groups, with no significant group × time effects. Gait did not significantly change. Since a priori feasibility criteria were met or exceeded, and there were no notable outcome differences between the two instruction approaches, this pilot study suggests a telerehabilitation approach to group tango class for people with PD is feasible and may have similar outcomes to in-person instruction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)740-746
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Telemedicine and Telecare
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • Parkinson disease
  • Telerehabilitation
  • adapted tango
  • adherence

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