Fall Prevention Bingo: Effects of a Novel Community-based Education Tool on Older Adults Knowledge and Readiness to Reduce Risks for Falls

Jenny Flint, Madison Morris, An Thi Nguyen, Marian Keglovits, Emily Kling Somerville, Yi Ling Hu, Susan L. Stark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Fall prevention education can increase knowledge of fall risks and promote behavior changes to help reduce the incidence of falls among older adults. Fall Prevention Bingo (FPB) was created as an engaging tool to deliver fall prevention education to older adults. Purpose: To evaluate the effects of FPB on older adults’ knowledge of fall risks, their readiness to make health behavior changes, and their attitudes toward reducing personal risks for falls. Methods: A total of 110 community-dwelling older adults (mean age: 72.0 ± 10.2 years) participated in the study across 11 senior or community centers in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Results: Knowledge of fall risk behaviors increased after playing FPB (p =.007). A ceiling effect occurred when measuring readiness to change. Participants reported that FPB was informative and interactive. Discussion: FPB is a fun and engaging educational tool that can be used to improve knowledge of fall risks among older adults. A ceiling effect obtained from the Stages of Change Score indicated that most participants had already made behavior changes to reduce risks for falls. Translation to Health Education Practice: FPB can be an effective method to deliver fall prevention education in community settings. A AJHE Self-Study quiz is online for this article via the SHAPE America Online Institute (SAOI) http://portal.shapeamerica.org/trn-Webinars.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406-412
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Education
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2020

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