Failure of acetazolamide to decrease intraocular pressure in patients with carbonic anhydrase II deficiency

Theodore Krupin, William S. Sly, Michael P. Whyte, Susanna J. Dodgson

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28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide on intraocular pressure was studied in two patients with carbonic anhydrase II deficiency and in six control subjects. The deficient patients had the autosomal recessive syndrome of osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis and cerebral calcification. A dose of 125 mg of intravenous acetazolamide caused a significant (P<.01) decrease in intraocular pressure from baseline (15.0 ± 1.5 mm Hg) in the control subjects one hour (11.3 ± 1.5 mm Hg) and four hours (13.8 ± 1.2 mm Hg) after drug administration. In contrast, the patients with carbonic anhydrase deficiency showed no such decrease in intraocular pressure; baseline intraocular pressure (19.2 ± 0.2 mm Hg) was significantly unchanged (P>.5) at one hour (20.0 ± 0.1 mm Hg) and four hours (19.2 ± 0.2 mm Hg).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)396-399
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of ophthalmology
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 1985

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