External Validation of a Mammography-Derived AI-Based Risk Model in a U.S. Breast Cancer Screening Cohort of White and Black Women

Aimilia Gastounioti, Mikael Eriksson, Eric A. Cohen, Walter Mankowski, Lauren Pantalone, Sarah Ehsan, Anne Marie McCarthy, Despina Kontos, Per Hall, Emily F. Conant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite the demonstrated potential of artificial intelligence (AI) in breast cancer risk assessment for personalizing screening recommendations, further validation is required regarding AI model bias and generalizability. We performed external validation on a U.S. screening cohort of a mammography-derived AI breast cancer risk model originally developed for European screening cohorts. We retrospectively identified 176 breast cancers with exams 3 months to 2 years prior to cancer diagnosis and a random sample of 4963 controls from women with at least one-year negative follow-up. A risk score for each woman was calculated via the AI risk model. Age-adjusted areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were estimated for the entire cohort and separately for White and Black women. The Gail 5-year risk model was also evaluated for comparison. The overall AUC was 0.68 (95% CIs 0.64–0.72) for all women, 0.67 (0.61–0.72) for White women, and 0.70 (0.65–0.76) for Black women. The AI risk model significantly outperformed the Gail risk model for all women p < 0.01 and for Black women p < 0.01, but not for White women p = 0.38. The performance of the mammography-derived AI risk model was comparable to previously reported European validation results; non-significantly different when comparing White and Black women; and overall, significantly higher than that of the Gail model.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4803
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2022

Keywords

  • artificial intelligence
  • breast cancer risk
  • breast density
  • digital mammography
  • racial disparities
  • screening
  • supplemental screening

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